Faebourne Is Here!

At least, the ebook is! You can get it on Amazon for just 99 cents for a limited time—and FREE if you have Kindle Unlimited.

Duncan Oliver was in every respect an unremarkable gentleman.

When mild-mannered Duncan Oliver is abducted by the Milne brothers and taken to their legendary home of Faebourne, his unexciting life becomes much more interesting. Adelia Milne has been cursed, and Duncan is her chosen champion to break the spell. Duncan may not be a hero, but he is a gentleman, and he refuses to leave a lady in distress. He becomes determined to take on the quest on Miss Milne’s behalf.

Meanwhile, an unlikely rescue team forms in the pairing of Duncan’s best friend George and valet Davies. As they set out for Faebourne—and also perchance to learn more about Davies’ obscured family history—what begins as an unequal partnership quickly blooms into friendship… and possibly something more.

Faebourne Update

For anyone waiting for it, Faebourne is now in formatting. With luck, the ebook will be out next week. The paperback is slated for November, and I hope to meet that deadline.

I’m going to once again advise readers that Faebourne does include a homosexual romantic subplot. So if you love Regency romances but are uncomfortable with gay characters, this one may not be for you. The book has a fairly typical heterosexual romance as well, but I think the m/m plot is given a bit more lens, mostly because George and Davies were just so much fun to write.

The book is still chaste and in keeping with the mores of the era. There is only one kiss, which comes at the end (sort of like Disney? except . . . gay?).

Some of you are looking at me (the screen) like this right now:

The more I write, the more I’m learning that my secondary characters are often a lot more fun and interesting than the main ones. You’d probably say, “Well, then make the secondary characters the main characters,” but it’s actually not that easy. If you watch a television show that has this great peripheral character . . . Well, I’ve noticed that sometimes, when the show starts to give more time and attention to those characters they become less fun and charming. I suppose what I mean is, some things (and people) are best in small doses. I don’t know if that’s true of my secondary characters. As it is, I didn’t originally plan to have much of George and Davies in the book at all, and then they just elbowed their way in. I hope readers enjoy them as much as I do.

And, of course, I hope readers enjoy the book as a whole, too!

Win a Copy of Faebourne!

This is completely random, and the two things are utterly unrelated, but last night I was futzing around on Spotify and adding some songs to my library. I realized I had no Elton John. Not that I’m some huge EJ fan, but there are a number of songs of his that I like, and two in particular. So I thought it might be fun for readers to guess what they might be. The first people to guess correctly will win a copy of Faebourne when it comes out on November 12.

Rules:

1. To enter, simply guess which Elton John song is my favorite.

2. You may only guess one song per comment. Up to three guesses per person.

3. Your guess must be posted in the comments here, on this post.

4. There are TWO winning answers, so two people will win.

5. Sorry, family and close friends, you are ineligible to enter. (“Close friends” does not include Internet friends and acquaintances.)

6. Contest will go until both songs have been correctly guessed OR until October 26, whichever comes first.

Spotify is not a sponsor of this contest, nor does it have any connection of any kind to said contest.

M/M Regency Romance

When I started writing Faebourne, I had a definite plan. It would be the typical Regency romance except that the male protagonist (Duncan) would be the one who needed rescuing from the very odd Milne family. That’s still in many ways the fundamental starting point for the plot. However, the planned romance between Duncan and Adelia Milne, well . . . It’s there, but not in as much force as another romance that has taken center stage in the book.

After Duncan’s abduction, his valet Davies and best friend George go in search of him. In the original manuscript, we didn’t even have any chapters from their points of view—it was all Duncan, all the time. But I decided that it wasn’t as interesting to have Davies and George just show up at Faebourne. Better to follow their little journey. And as their characters grew, they, erm . . . They fell in love.

Now, this leaves me in a conundrum of sorts. A number of people who read sweet, clean, historical romances do so because their religious views don’t allow for anything more, er, graphic. It’s the reason I grew up reading Regencies, and though I’ve since left my sheltered childhood, I still greatly enjoy these kinds of books. (And I still don’t read steamy romances.) Those same religious views often frown on homosexual relationships. So I’m a bit afraid that Davies + George will offend a number of potential readers. I’m afraid I’ll get bad reviews because of it. Which is why I’m trying very hard to make sure readers know BEFORE they buy the book. That way, if it’s not their cup of tea per se, they can steer clear.

I did seriously consider going back and taking the relationship out. But honestly, it’s one of the best things in the book (in my authorial opinion). It’s a darling I can’t quite bring myself to murder.

Readers familiar with the broader spectrum of my work won’t be surprised to find a gay couple in Faebourne. But those who have only read Brynnde, which is far more heteronormative and hews to the traditional aspects of the genre, may be caught off guard.

SO. Be aware and spread the word: the “romance” in Faebourne: A Regency Romance is—at least in one of the two couples showcased (and the couple whose romance is most focused on)—a gay one. Don’t read it if you think that will bother you.

Winning the [Ear] Lottery

A week ago, I lost hearing in my left ear. Honestly, it just felt muffled, like when you change elevations. But nothing I did could clear it. So I went to the doctor.

She looked in my ear and told me it appeared my eardrum had ruptured.

She wanted me to see an ENT, but of course they couldn’t get me in until yesterday. So for a week I’ve been deaf in one ear, and I’ve also had to take antibiotics because my ear started weeping. Ugh. That, in turn, led to ear pain and jaw pain and a swollen lymph node. I couldn’t chew, so I had to eat only soup and other soft foods like pasta.

It’s been a blast.

The ENT first gave me a hearing test, which I felt was kind of dumb since it was more than clear I can’t hear out of one ear. The test confirmed this. But it also made clear that (a) my right ear works beautifully, and (b) the problem with my left ear is not permanent. The bone and nerves are fine. It’s the middle ear that has an issue.

Finally, they actually looked in my ear. And it turns out I’d won the lottery. I have an ear infection AND a perforated eardrum. So they sucked gunk out of my ear, then put more gunk into my ear to clear the infection. I have to walk around with this gunk in my ear for a week. Then I get to go back to the ENT and have them suck it out. Hopefully that’s all that will be required. They can’t get a good look at the eardrum until this bit is taken care of. Once it is, they’ll be able to tell whether the eardrum is healing on its own (which is most likely) or will need to be patched.

What does this have to do with writing? Well, I’ve lost a week to having earaches that felt like someone was stabbing me in the ear with a screwdriver. (And now the inside of my ear is crazy itchy, but there’s nothing I can do about it.) The sum total is that I’ll probably have to push back Faebourne‘s release again. Sigh. It’s a mess, I’m a mess, the world is a mess. Best laid plans and all that. But I don’t want to release a half-baked book, so I’m going to take my time and do it right. I thank you for your patience and promise it will be worth it in the end.

A Couple Updates

So I have a couple bits of information for you. 1. The release date for Faebourne has been pushed back a bit. I really resisted doing this, but in order to give you the best possible book, it’s going to take me a little more time. And I’d rather give you a good book than a rushed one. The new publication date is 4 September.

2. For those of you in the Bay Area, I’ll be giving a presentation about writing and publishing at the Livermore Public Library in November. Yes, it’s some months away! But mark your calendars now so you don’t forget: 15 November, 7:00 p.m.. I’ll talk about the writing process and also about various publishing options. Just in time for NaNoWriMo!

And finally, a reminder that Brynnde is now available in audiobook format. You can pick it up here. And then you’ll finally know how to properly pronounce “Brynnde”!

A Handful of Water

I have a few things going on at the moment. For one, trying to get Faebourne ready for publication in August. For another, I’m waiting on responses to Hamlette from five places that are considering it. And then my short story “The Zodiac Clock” is likewise on submission to four places.

I’ve stopped submitting both Hamlette and “The Zodiac Clock.” If Hamlette doesn’t take, I’ll most likely self-publish it. Probably the same for “TZC” though I’d maybe try to write a few more stories and package it as an anthology.

I’m also waiting to hear from conferences where I’ve been put on lists to possibly be a featured author. I love going to conferences, but I’m at the point that I can’t justify the expense—particularly if there is a lot of travel—unless I’m at least contributing and being acknowledged. Still, I also recognize that I’m not as well known as some authors, and conferences want known names that will draw a crowd. At the same time, it’s a bit like the book marketing and publicity Catch-22: publishers put their marketing dollars behind authors who already sell. You’d think conference-goers would maybe get tired of the same handful of authors at each event and instead look for some new and interesting names? Or not.

I try not to be bitter, but I’ll admit a certain amount of frustration. People will say I should hide that side of me, but I believe in being real and honest about the hardships of being an author. It’s not all glamor. A lot of the time it feels like scraping and elbowing your way through a densely packed crowd.

So why call this post “A Handful of Water”? Because that’s also what it feels like: trying to hold something in your hands that leaks through. It’s fluid, and it’s running everywhere. I’ve got so much going on with submissions and my WIP . . . It’s hard to hold on to it all sometimes. And maybe I don’t have to. Maybe the only person who insists on it is me. I don’t know why I put so much pressure on myself, but . . . I feel worthless otherwise. All I have to offer the world is me and my work. If that’s not enough, then I don’t know why I’m here.

WIP: Faebourne

Due out 7 August!

It’s part Regency romance, part fairy tale. To tide you over, here is a little excerpt:

“May I suggest, Miss Odette, that walking alone through dark forests is perhaps not the safest way to spend your evening?”

She pursed her perfectly rose pink lips at him. “I’m entirely safe barring any strange men carrying iron cauldrons. I’d say, in fact, I’m more safe alone with myself than alone with you.”

Duncan was tempted to point out that being with him meant she wasn’t alone but chose to pursue the greater point. “I promise I am no threat to you, Miss Odette.”

“Then why do you have that?” She pointed at the pot.

He grimaced, feeling foolish. The errand, after all, defied explanation, but he tried anyway. “I’m supposed to catch a—oh,” he said, realizing. “You’re… a song?”

“I’m always a song, and I’m sometimes a person,” she told him.

“You look remarkably like someone I know,” Duncan said. She was just Adelia’s height, too, and had her hair piled and curled in the same way. Odette’s movements and voice, however, were utterly different.

“All songs look like someone you know,” said Odette. “Or places. Some days I’m whole fields of flowers.” She gaze became distant and unfocused, her face alight and wistful. “Those are nice days.”

IWSG: Deadline!

It’s time again for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group! Posts go up the first Wednesday of each month. Read more posts and/or join in here.

This month I’m mostly insecure about finishing this project in time for the August 7 release date!

Question of the Month: What’s harder for you to come up with, book titles or character names?

Oh, I’d say they’re equally difficult but not at the same time. I either have the title and the names become a challenge, or I have the characters and can’t think of a title. It never seems to be that both are easy or both are hard. I wonder why that is?