Now Available: “Fearless” by Christine Rains

I’ll be reviewing it later, but you can get your copy free on Smashwords or via Createspace. Lots of different formats supported, so take your pick.

For those wondering, the story is of Abby, a young woman who helps children fight off the monsters under their beds and in their closets. Genre is paranormal romance.

And don’t forget: I’ll be interviewing Christine right here on my site on August 9th!

Writing Opportunity: AACT New Play Fest

Just a heads up since the actual call for scripts isn’t expected to come until the fall, but the American Association of Community Theatre is putting together a New Play Festival (AACTNewPlayFest) in which selected community theatres across the country will produce new works by unpublished playwrights. Details here; keep checking for updates.

Just a note to point out that, in order to make it faster and easier to find my books, I’ve added a “Shop” button to the top of the page. My e-books are featured there, each with links to the various available formats.

Dramatists Guild Statement re “3C” by David Adjmi

We of the Dramatists Guild of America wholeheartedly support playwright David Adjmi who has been facing pressure to silence his play “3C”. His work is a darkly comic parody of the sitcom “Three’s Company”, intended to critique the show and the social mores underlying it. The copyright owners of that work have written a “cease and desist” letter, which would, in effect, require him to stick the play in a drawer forever. But works of parody are protected under the “fair use” doctrine of copyright law, because such works serve as valuable social criticism. Corporate interests may prefer not to have their properties targeted for mockery, but artists have the right to do so, regardless of the best bullying tactics that corporate profits can buy. And more than having the right to do so, artists have an obligation to critique the vestments of our culture. So we stand with Mr. Adjmi, and are in discussions with him to see what assistance he might require. We hope others will show their support for David as well. Because, by so doing, we demonstrate that culture is too important to be controlled solely by the corporations that claim to own it.

Stephen Schwartz, President
Dramatists Guild of America, Inc.

“St. Peter in Chains” Climbing the Kindle Charts

My e-novella “St. Peter in Chains” just made #10 in gay fiction on Amazon, and has cracked the top 50 in suspense. Thanks, everyone, for your support! I hope you enjoy the story!

“St. Peter in Chains” is free on Amazon through this Friday, July 20. So is my Sherlock Holmes story “The Mystery of the Last Line.” You can find both on my Amazon author page.

“The Mystery of the Last Line” is also free over at Smashwords. It will be up at iBooks and Nook soon.

“St. Peter in Chains” FREE on Kindle this week!

This Monday through Friday (July 16-20), you can download my novella “St. Peter in Chains” from Amazon for free! No need for a code or anything, just pop on over there and pick it up! (Of course, this promotion is for Kindle users; if you want a free copy but don’t have a Kindle, you can always go read Christine Rains’s interview with me and get the promo code for a free Smashwords version.)

As an aside, “The Mystery of the Last Line” (my Sherlock Holmes story) is also FREE on Smashwords.

Coming Soon

You might notice it over in the sidebar, but in case you don’t have the energy to scroll down: It will be a free e-story, written in the Doyle style, meaning it’s set in Holmes’ original era and told from the point of view of Dr Watson. It’s being formatted now; I’ll certainly let you know when it’s available!

Also as another aside, I now have a tumblr, though I’m not sure yet what I’ll do with it, if anything. I’ve already got too much going on, but I like playing around with the different media interfaces and seeing who and what are out there. It’s almost like sending signals out into space and seeing if any alien life responds . . .

Interview

Head over to Christine Rains’s blog for an interview with me + a freebie!

I should add that I originally conceived of “St. Peter in Chains” as a stage play but wrote it in novella form first, then adapted a stage version and a screenplay. I was told by a couple theatre directors that it would be difficult to do on stage but might be ideal for film.

It’s funny, but I do find it easier (faster, really) to write in prose and then adapt to other media. Sitting down to write something flat out as a screenplay is more difficult for me, though I have done and can do it. For stage work, I can go either way. My reasons for doing “St. Peter” in prose first was to work through Peter’s range of emotions so I’d be able to give the actors enough to work with later.

I don’t direct in my writing. Some directors love that, and some hate it, and some are just confused by it. But we were taught in screenwriting class not to call the shots—literally. That’s the director’s job, and later the editor’s job: to make it look right in the end. As a screenwriter (and playwright), I feel it’s my job to tell a good story, and to give the actors/characters enough material to make it work. So I guess I do direct the actors in a subversive way, though I only dictate actions that are key to the plot; mostly my goal is to give them a toolbox of emotions and motivations to help them build and understand their characters.

The result is I sometimes (often, actually) get actors who are very excited by my scripts and directors who have a lot of questions about “how [I] picture” this or that, what I was seeing as I was writing, I suppose. But as a screenwriter it isn’t only my vision that counts, I don’t think, and if I’ve written something well enough, a good director will have a vision of his own as he reads the script. Though I always appreciate collaboration.