“St. Peter in Chains” Climbing the Kindle Charts

My e-novella “St. Peter in Chains” just made #10 in gay fiction on Amazon, and has cracked the top 50 in suspense. Thanks, everyone, for your support! I hope you enjoy the story!

“St. Peter in Chains” is free on Amazon through this Friday, July 20. So is my Sherlock Holmes story “The Mystery of the Last Line.” You can find both on my Amazon author page.

“The Mystery of the Last Line” is also free over at Smashwords. It will be up at iBooks and Nook soon.

“St. Peter in Chains” FREE on Kindle this week!

This Monday through Friday (July 16-20), you can download my novella “St. Peter in Chains” from Amazon for free! No need for a code or anything, just pop on over there and pick it up! (Of course, this promotion is for Kindle users; if you want a free copy but don’t have a Kindle, you can always go read Christine Rains’s interview with me and get the promo code for a free Smashwords version.)

As an aside, “The Mystery of the Last Line” (my Sherlock Holmes story) is also FREE on Smashwords.

Coming Soon

You might notice it over in the sidebar, but in case you don’t have the energy to scroll down: It will be a free e-story, written in the Doyle style, meaning it’s set in Holmes’ original era and told from the point of view of Dr Watson. It’s being formatted now; I’ll certainly let you know when it’s available!

Also as another aside, I now have a tumblr, though I’m not sure yet what I’ll do with it, if anything. I’ve already got too much going on, but I like playing around with the different media interfaces and seeing who and what are out there. It’s almost like sending signals out into space and seeing if any alien life responds . . .

Interview

Head over to Christine Rains’s blog for an interview with me + a freebie!

I should add that I originally conceived of “St. Peter in Chains” as a stage play but wrote it in novella form first, then adapted a stage version and a screenplay. I was told by a couple theatre directors that it would be difficult to do on stage but might be ideal for film.

It’s funny, but I do find it easier (faster, really) to write in prose and then adapt to other media. Sitting down to write something flat out as a screenplay is more difficult for me, though I have done and can do it. For stage work, I can go either way. My reasons for doing “St. Peter” in prose first was to work through Peter’s range of emotions so I’d be able to give the actors enough to work with later.

I don’t direct in my writing. Some directors love that, and some hate it, and some are just confused by it. But we were taught in screenwriting class not to call the shots—literally. That’s the director’s job, and later the editor’s job: to make it look right in the end. As a screenwriter (and playwright), I feel it’s my job to tell a good story, and to give the actors/characters enough material to make it work. So I guess I do direct the actors in a subversive way, though I only dictate actions that are key to the plot; mostly my goal is to give them a toolbox of emotions and motivations to help them build and understand their characters.

The result is I sometimes (often, actually) get actors who are very excited by my scripts and directors who have a lot of questions about “how [I] picture” this or that, what I was seeing as I was writing, I suppose. But as a screenwriter it isn’t only my vision that counts, I don’t think, and if I’ve written something well enough, a good director will have a vision of his own as he reads the script. Though I always appreciate collaboration.

More on “St. Peter in Chains” & some K-Pro

Fellow writer Christine Rains will be posting her review of “St. Peter in Chains” on her site on Tuesday. The following Monday, July 9, she’ll publish an interview with yours truly. Thanks, Christine, for the awesome hospitality!

Now to focus on The K-Pro. I’ve given myself a deadline of July 31 to finish the draft. I’m not sure yet how realistic that actually is since lately I’ve felt kind of flat when it comes to writing, but I’m sure as hell gonna try. I sometimes forget that a draft is just that: a draft. It doesn’t have to be perfect. It won’t be. But if I want to try Camp NaNo in August, I need The K-Pro to be done first.

Writing Opportunity: Wasafiri New Writing Prize 2012

Wasafiri New Writing Prize 2012

The details of the prize are as follows:

Categories: Fiction; Poetry; Life Writing
Word limit: 3000 (or five poems)
Deadline: 27 July 2012 5pm GMT
Prize: £300 and publication in Wasafiri magazine
Fee: £6.00 if entering one category, £10 for two and £15 for all three

The prize is open to anyone worldwide who has not published a complete book in the category they wish to enter. Other terms and conditions apply, please visit www.wasafiri.org for further information and to download the application form, or email wasafiri@open.ac.uk

“Warm Bodies” at Source Festival DC

Today my 10-minute play will have its first Source Festival showing in Washington DC as part of the “Ethereal Encounters” program. Note I didn’t say it was premiering at Source; it actually had its world premiere in Connecticut last February. I was lucky enough to get to see that show (at Valley Repertory in Enfield), and I’m excited that I’ll be able to see the Source Festival version in a couple weeks (June 23). There will be five performances of “Warm Bodies” over the course of the month. Here’s hoping the actors break, er, all their legs? Somehow that doesn’t seem right . . .