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The American Version of Sherlock?

So I was reading my Daily Variety (and no, I won’t make fun of my husband’s inability to interpret the headlines–or even most of the articles’ content–due to jargon) and saw that TNT was working on a show called Enigma, which is “a modern-day Sherlock Holmes.” Haven’t I already seen this show somewhere?

Oh, yes. Yes, I have.

Well, Sherlock Holmes is public domain. But I wonder how closely the BBC and Steven Moffat and co. will be watching for potential infringement. It’s a murky area, I would think.

And where will they set this American version? New York maybe? Is that the closest we have to a London on this side of the Atlantic? Will the character even be named Sherlock Holmes, or was that just the general pitch for the show?

Curiouser and curiouser.

I don’t watch anything on TNT myself, but I may need to keep an eye on this one.

Snap Back

Someone called Steven Moffat a c*nt on Twitter this morning and he asked, “Does everybody get this and is it increasing?” Well, generally speaking, most people aren’t in the public eye enough for that kind of venom (at least, I’m supposing they’re not). But as a rule, the more you put yourself out there, the bigger a target you’ll become. I think my post on negative “fans” covers the bases on this.

In other, happier, fan news, please go visit my friend Rejected Riter (link also on sidebar). I’ve been posting about recent rejections, but RR helps lift some of the cloud cover.

Tailspin

Seeing as work is the best way (for me at least) to soothe my sorrowful heart after a shower of rejections, I prepped some stuff for submission today and mailed it out. Even that much feels like a bit of progress. Of course, it may only yield more rejection . . . Vicious circle, this writing business.

I meant to do some actual writing, too, but had other errands to run. I’m glad, though, to have gotten some writing-related activities taken care of.

My son said to me today that he thought I’d be bored while he was at school. “You’ll do all your writing at once and then you won’t have anything to do!” I tried to explain that it doesn’t all happen at once, that most writing takes longer than a day. I’m not sure he believed me, though.

Having finished the draft of 20 August (my two-act play), I’m turning my attention once again to “The K-Pro.” And my scripts. And then at some point, when I feel enough time has lapsed, I’ll go edit 20 August . . . Did I mention the bit about the vicious circle? It’s rather like chasing one’s tail. But better to have too many projects than not enough. I hate dry spells. Would much prefer to stay busy, juiced up with ideas.

And so . . .

Another rejection today, this time for “Warm Bodies.” But they were nice about it, saying that it just didn’t fit in with the kinds of plays they publish. This publisher apparently focuses on the kinds of things kids do in school, and I can agree that “Warm Bodies” is a bit much for that crowd. However, I wish their website had been more clear about this, since it said they publish stuff for community theatres and such as well (which is exactly what I wrote “Warm Bodies” for). I will try it elsewhere.

It is difficult, though, not to get discouraged when it seems to be raining rejections. Some days I feel like I might never be successful on any front, no matter how hard I try.

Mixed Results

Well, on the up side I finished the first draft of my two-act play and sent it to the theatre in London that had asked to see something in longer form. They wanted to get a sense of my style, so I felt that even though it was a draft, it suited the purpose. Though of course I added a note that it was just a draft.

But on the down side . . . Another rejection for a couple of my short stories. Rejections are always difficult, and this one felt particularly harsh, not because they were mean about it per se but it was just the stark wording: “The piece is not for us. Best of luck with this.” Really? That’s the best you can do when letting someone down?

Here’s hoping the play does better for me.

And did you see that BBC Books is planning to do Sherlock books after all? Now how do I get my foot in that door, I wonder?

Sparkfest – Day 5

Last day of Sparkfest!

It’s funny because I wouldn’t necessarily look at the things I write and immediately think: Well, I wrote that from experience. But experiences do color everything we write. One doesn’t neatly separate the writer from what has been written.

I’ll give a specific example of a scene I anticipate using in my “K-Pro” story. I was alone and traveling abroad (I like to travel; I find it another way of finding inspiration, especially when I’m alone and can absorb without distraction), and I got lost in a large international city. This was before I had a handy cell phone or any such thing. Yes, I’m that old! But a gentleman came along, and I suppose I looked rather distressed, and he did this interesting thing where he put his hand on the small of my back as if to guide me. And it was sweet and reassuring and a bit startling all at once, and something I’ll never forget. So I will take this action and use it in my story, because I think my male lead character is the kind of person who might do something like this, and I will embellish it a bit because that is what writers do. I will take it that step further–imagination makes it easy to picture that, when the woman turns, naturally the man’s arm will come around her and there will be a kiss. Yes?

Travel “sparks” me in that it becomes part of my broad experience and gives me new and different perspectives on the world. I could write about the place I grew up, and my family would certainly make an entertaining story in its own right, but having traveled gives me the ability to pick and choose from a variety of people and places, it gives me more material to build with so to speak. From the farmlands around my hometown to this stranger in a foreign metropolis, I can combine and create an infinite number of possibilities, rounding them out with my own imaginings.

And kisses are universal.

Sparkfest – Day 4

What else can I say about inspiration and/or spark? One can go the conventional routes: art and photographs that inspire, people watching and overheard snippets of conversation. I’ve mentioned before that I find poetry inspirational as well.

I think writing is a sort of engineering. One draws the necessary materials from a variety of places and fashions them into something new and different. The elements all remain, but they are used in unusual ways and are sometimes disguised. Depending on what you’re building–writing–you may want one thing to show through or another, or you may want to hide most of the construction by decorating (just don’t overdo it).

As you might notice, I tend to think in metaphors.

My parents are analytical people, and I inherited a certain amount of logical ways of thinking from them. But my family has a history of art and poetry, too, and while I’m useless at drawing or painting and my poetry is weak at best, I definitely got the creative gene. Sometimes spark is on the inside, settled like a seed. My insides are tangled with vines of various sorts that need pruning now and again but serve me well in a variety of ways. Climbing, swinging . . .

So yes, I think my tendency to take one thing and equate or relate it to something that most people wouldn’t match it to (see yesterday’s post about music) has something to do with the blend of problem-solving skills and creativity I inherited. Take my story “A Society of Martlets” for example. I was looking at the family crest, which has martlets on it, and thinking I like the word “martlet” and might like to use it somehow. And I was reading a book about Edward III and it touched on the dissolution of the Knights Templar. I can’t remember why I was thinking of Lambeth, though. But somehow I took all these things and knit them together anyway.

History is a great place to dig for ideas, by the way. There’s so much of it and so many possible angles. I tend to go backward instead of forward for whatever reason; I don’t write future fiction or anything like that, never minding my love of Star Trek and Doctor Who. Maybe I can blame all those Indiana Jones movies as a kid for that?

Sparkfest – Day 3

I’ve mentioned this before, but in terms of inspiration–or “spark”–I find a lot of mine in music.

For as long as I can remember, I’ve linked songs to story. Maybe it’s because my favorite songs as a child told a story; I especially liked “Chanson Pour Les Petits Enfants” and “Band on the Run” and “The Gambler.” So somewhere in the back of my mind, every song became a story (and I guess in a way they all are), and I just began to fill in the missing bits.

When I got to that age where one begins to make mix tapes (CDs and playlists now, I suppose), I would pick a character or TV show or movie and put together songs that I felt were connected to them in some way. My cassettes were stories of a sort, and my friends would come to me, bewildered, and say, “I never would have thought . . . But I absolutely see now how these things fit.”

Sometimes it’s hard for me to remember not everyone sees and hears things the way I do. Being a writer means living somewhere in your head, and the words are the open door when you invite someone in.

I was working on a major motion picture at one point, and they let me help put together the soundtrack. And while the movie itself was only so-so–it was never big at the box office and only rarely ends up on a movie channel late at night–the soundtrack became a bestseller. Too bad as a lowly PA I didn’t receive any credit! But I can look at the track list and know I was the one to suggest the Rolling Stones.

So yes, sometimes when a song comes on the radio and I start to really listen–because for me lyrics are just as important as beat or rhythm or melody–something will spring to mind. The song sparks my imagination, and I find I must go play with whatever idea has been ignited.

Sparkfest – Day 2

So my post earlier today was about the two big projects I’m currently working on. In keeping with Sparkfest, then, I’ll talk about what, well, sparked them.

The play came from a drive. Quite simply, I went over a bridge. I was thinking at the time that I needed an idea for this play, and I might’ve seen something about the lottery out of the corner of my eye? Somewhere in there, the first line of the play sprang to mind: “The day Lucky jumped off the bridge was the day he won the Lotto.”

The “K-Pro” story was something that simmered for a lot longer. I have a tendency to lie in bed and think a lot. Daydream, make up stories, whatever. But this story is an odd blend of personal experience–that is, time I’ve spent on film sets and with actors (one of the main characters is an actor), time spent abroad, and my own history. They do say write what you know. I’d probably add: but make it more interesting.

WIPs

I thought I might expand a bit more on my two current projects, which I mentioned briefly in yesterday’s Sparkfest post.

(1) The play I’m writing–this one is a full-length play–is about a man who jumps off a bridge. Sort of. Is any play ever really about what it pretends to be about? My previous playwriting effort, “Warm Bodies,” has been generally well received, so I hope this one will be too. I’ve dabbled in scene writing before, and I’ve even taught playwriting classes, so it’s funny that I never really tapped into that side of me for out-and-out writing. I only wrote “Warm Bodies” because someone asked for a 10-minute play for a directors’ workshop, and I thought, Well, it can’t be so different from screenwriting, so long as you keep it in your head that they can’t do quick cuts and will need time to change sets. Right? It probably helped that I do have a modest history in stage acting.

(2) The story I’m writing, which looks like it will be novella length before long, is called “The K-Pro.” It’s, uh, different from my usual thing. But not in a bad way. Can’t quite tell if it’s going to go the paranormal romance route or just be a kind of weird . . . thing.

And once I finish these two projects, I have a couple of actual screenwriting projects to get on with. “Something Real” is a romantic comedy, and I also have a TV spec script to sort out. When it rains, it pours! I’ll be off to NYC this weekend to devote some real time to all of this; it can be difficult to concentrate at home with the ins and outs of family.