Life with a Nutritionist

No, I’m not living with one. At least, not in close quarters. I am living with one telling me how and what and when to eat.

First off: Why hire a nutritionist? At my last general wellness visit with my doctor, I told her that I kept gaining weight and nothing I did seemed to stop or reverse it. I’d changed my eating habits, begun counting calories, was exercising—nothing worked. My doctor told me not to be concerned, but as a precaution she also sent me for blood tests. Everything came back normal. So then I got sent to a gastroenterologist. He diagnosed me with “low motility,” meaning my gut is slow at digesting and *ahem* eliminating. He put me on an expensive medication that kept me tied to the bathroom. I decided the cure was worse than the disease and quit after a month.

Finally, my doctor suggested a nutritionist. So I decided the start of a new year was the perfect time to tackle a new health regimen. I’m now four weeks into a nine week program. I’ve lost about 11 pounds, and of that about half has been body fat. I look better, but it hasn’t been easy, and I do worry whether I’ll be able to keep the weight off.

Here’s the current situation: I have to eat certain amounts and kids of foods at certain times of day. I eat at 6:00 a.m., 9:00 a.m., noon, 3:00 p.m., 5:30 p.m., and around 9:30 or 10:00 p.m. (roughly half an hour before I go to bed). At those times, I have to pick from an approved list of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. I cannot have breads (except Paleo bread), pasta, or dairy. I can’t have sugar; the only sweetener I’m allowed is Stevia. I can’t have starches like corn, rice, potatoes, carrots, or bananas. It’s not very fun, especially for someone who loves cheesesteak, mashed potatoes, and ice cream.

On top of all this, I have to take a lot of pills. First thing in the morning I take a probiotic and two Omega fish oil capsules. With breakfast, I’m supposed to take a Caltrate, too. Before lunch and again before dinner I take a starch blocker. At dinner I take three more Omega-3 capsules, a vitamin C tablet, another Caltrate, and another probiotic. Oh, and somewhere in all that I also take a magnesium pill as well. Yeah, it’s pretty f***ing insane.

And not inexpensive. All the health food, all the pills—the cost adds up quickly.

My nutritionist says that I’ll be able to add dairy and bread back into my diet at a later date (when we get to “maintenance”), once we’ve rebalanced my hormones or whatever. She also says I probably won’t want those things, but I have serious doubts about that. I don’t crave them the way I did in the first week or so, but I still want to be able to eat them. There’s nothing to make you want something like being told you can’t have it.

I worry I’ll be stuck eating off this restricted menu for the rest of my life. That if I don’t, I’ll just gain all this weight back and be fat again. And sometimes I wonder if losing weight and being healthy is worth all this sacrifice. I honestly can’t decide. I want to be healthy… But I also want to enjoy life. Eating should be a pleasure, not a chore.

So I’m about halfway through this… experiment? I don’t know if that’s exactly the right word. We’ll see what happens. I don’t have the extra energy that the nutritionist said I’d have, but I am sleeping better than before. That’s a plus. I worry about things like vacations. I want to be able to eat and not have to think about whether it fits my prescribed menu, and without feeling guilty for my choices. I’m not convinced there’s a good middle ground except moderation. And a life full of pills and supplements.

Worth it? What do you think?