Five years ago, I had no real plan.

Five years ago today, I went into surgery first thing in the morning. Nothing major; I just had a bone spur on my right index finger that was making it painful and almost impossible to write or type. After the surgery, I hopped in the car and headed down to Enfield, Connecticut, where my play “Warm Bodies” premiered. It was my first ever produced play, and I consider that to more or less be the moment that officially started my writing career. I’d worked in publishing, and before that in film, but having a play produced was the jumping off point for my own work.

In fact, 2012 was a big year. Not even a month later, we moved from Massachusetts to California. That June, my play was produced again as part of the Source Festival in Washington D.C. (It would later go on to become the short film Adverse Possession.) 2012 was the year I first self-published two of my Sherlock Holmes stories. It really, truly was the year I decided to be a writer. For realz.

If you’d asked me then about a five-year plan, I’d have given you a blank look and said, “I dunno. Write, I guess?” If you ask me now, I’ll probably give you a similar answer. I do have a better idea of some of what I’d like to accomplish, but I also remind myself to be grateful for the opportunities I’ve had and proud of how far I’ve come. It’s easy sometimes to be frustrated with a seeming lack of progress. But in reality, I’ve come a long way. And I have a lot of great things to show for those five years: 6 self-published books, 2 traditionally published books, a play, a short film, an award-winning screenplay (that I’m still hoping to get produced one of these days—put it on the next five-year plan) . . . Not a bad haul.

But I couldn’t do it without YOU, dear readers and fellow writers. THANK YOU for the support over the years. I’ll be celebrating five years of writing by putting out an audiobook later this year, too. Hope you’ll enjoy that and whatever else might come from these [now fully functional] fingers.