A little more from The Great Divide (Changers 2):

“I have faith in the people I know,” Arlon said.

“And distrust for the people you don’t,” Annice finished. “By that logic, I have no reason to trust you.”

Arlon looked at her again, this time startled. “You know me.”

“Not really,” said Annice. “I know Mrs. Montague a bit because she is—was—our neighbor, but you were ahead of me in school and I’m not friends with Marcus or Cee, so… Tell me again why I should trust you?”

“Because I helped you!”

“You knocked me out of a window and made me a fugitive. Some help.”

That’s my handsome 11-year-old son. I know I don’t write a ton about my family—I’m private that way—but I just love this picture too much not to share it. I think the 80s have come back into style. You’ll see my son’s hair is pretty long, and I’ve noticed a number of his [male] classmates are rocking the long hair lately, too.

My son does get mistaken for a girl, but only when he puts his hair in a ponytail.

In other news—writing news—I’ve been given a wonderful opportunity to attend a small workshop/retreat in France this coming June. I’m very much looking forward to it! And I promise to post lots of pictures, if not here then on my Facebook page. In the meantime, I’m still working away at Changers 2 and my stack of other projects. (If you enjoyed Brynnde I think you’ll really love Faebourne when it’s finished!) I’m busier now than I can ever remember being in my life. Probably because I’m naturally a bit lazy. I admit it. Having too much to do stresses me out because I’m the kind of person who needs frequent quiet and alone time to recharge. That hasn’t been possible in recent weeks, which is another reason to look forward to the writing retreat. Well, and France. Who couldn’t look forward to that???

I need about 40,000 more words to finish The Great Divide, maybe a few less. The goal is to be done by the end of April. So here is my Pacemaker graph for tracking my progress.

The Great Divide (Changers 2) is under way as I type this. (Well, not as I type this because I’m typing this rather than working on Changers 2, but . . . Yeah. Let’s just say I’ve been working on it.) Here’s a taste:

Guin felt as though a net were closing around her. One she couldn’t see or fight. She stood there, opening and closing her fists while her mind reeled. Go back to the Vulpes? No, couldn’t put them in danger again. Go after Marcus and Cee? Maybe…

Warm hands closed around Guin’s own and drew them gently together, startling her out of her racing thoughts. She lifted her head to meet Rand’s dark, compassionate gaze.

“It’s going to be okay,” he said.

“You don’t know that,” Guin said. The words felt too big for her throat, but she managed to squeeze them out. “You can’t promise that.”

InsecureWritersSupportGroup It’s time again for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group. Read and support writers by clicking here, and if you’re a writer you can also join!

Writer’s block is what has me insecure this month. I simply can’t seem to make headway with the Changers sequel, and that’s causing a certain amount of anxiety in me. I’ve got a little over 20k words written, and now I’m well and truly stuck. I’ve tried just writing through it, but no. I’ve outlined, so I know where I need to go, I just feel like a wagon with its wheels in the mud. I’ve considered skipping the chapter I’m on and writing the rest, but I can’t work that way—I’m a linear writer. I’ve dabbled with other projects on the side, but I know this book needs to get finished, and that’s probably making things that much worse. *headdesk* Anyone else want to write this book for me?

Question of the Month: Have you ever pulled out a really old story and reworked it? Did it work out?

Uh, I’ve pulled out some old stuff now and then and looked at it. I’ve even thought, I should do something with this. And then I never do. I don’t know why. In particular, I would like to rework my Master’s thesis, which was a middle grade historical fantasy. It’s on my list of project, but I don’t know if or when I’ll ever actually be ready to tackle it.

From my current Regency romance WIP Faebourne:

“Do you live here all the time?” Edward asked.

Duncan shook his head. “Only when the servants get bored.”

Richard cocked his head, and his gray eyes gleamed with bright interest. “You would not choose London over the country?”

Duncan sat back and sighed. “I don’t know,” he said after a minute’s rumination. “I’ve never had to choose.”

“But if you did? Have to choose, that is?” Edward asked.

Duncan considered. “Dove Hill is where I grew up. And it is roomier. I think… Yes, I would say I am more attached to it than here.”

“You would choose the country,” said Richard.

Duncan nodded. “Yes, I daresay I would.”

Upon later reflection, it seemed to Duncan that Richard and Edward exchanged a meaningful look when he spoke those words. But hindsight is always clearer, as they say, particularly after one has been kidnapped.

Which project would you most like to see me do next?

 
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Here are the goals I set for myself for 2017. I can check the first one off! (Achieved goals are changed to green.)

  1. Publish Brynnde
  2. Finish and submit Changers: The Great Divide
  3. Finish Hamlette
  4. Write another Sherlock Holmes story

This morning I dusted off Hamlette, so . . .

Oh, and #4 may be transmuted to “create an audio version of my Sherlock Holmes stories,” which I am currently in the process of as well.

Every time I write and release a book, I feel so sure it’s “the one.” You know, the one that will break out and do well. I felt so sure Peter would be my bright star, and then Manifesting Destiny (which ostensibly has a much wider market potential), and now I find myself hoping Brynnde will find a solid readership.

Sigh.

It would be easy to lapse into yet another lament about how difficult it is to get discovered in this business. How tough it is to be heard and seen above the clamor.

If I get hung up on it—on the numbers—I’ll lose the will to write. I’ll cease to enjoy it for its own sake because I’ll be too anxious about how no one wants to read what I write. And then my writing will get worse instead of better because I’ll be forcing it, or trying to write what I think others want to read, or something.

Well then. Head down, eyes on my work. I can at least say that, yes, Manifesting Destiny has done relatively well (and it’s all relative, isn’t it?). And it remains to be seen what happens with Brynnde. In the meantime, I’ll get on with it.

The beginning of a new Regency romance titled Faebourne:

Duncan Oliver was in every respect an unremarkable gentleman. He was not tall, though also not any shorter than would be deemed respectable. He was not rich, though again not particularly in want. And though he rode well, he was not especially keen on sports or gaming. To summarize, Duncan Oliver was the kind of man easily overlooked by the world. To this he had become accustomed and resigned.

And so the day someone finally did notice him became the day his life changed.

This one is Regency with a touch of magic.